Morristown girl battling rare condition, parents urging awarenes

Morristown girl battling rare condition, parents urging awareness

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Brooklyn is battling a rare disorder called dystonia. It affects her legs, arms, speech, and brain. Brooklyn is battling a rare disorder called dystonia. It affects her legs, arms, speech, and brain.
"I feel that there's not enough answers out there. You can run as many tests as you want to and everybody's got something different," said Sandra Eldridge, Brooklyn's mother. "I feel that there's not enough answers out there. You can run as many tests as you want to and everybody's got something different," said Sandra Eldridge, Brooklyn's mother.
"In her own mind, she thinks she's as normal as any kid. She's a lot stronger than I am. She's my hero," said Pete Balzano, Brooklyn's father. "In her own mind, she thinks she's as normal as any kid. She's a lot stronger than I am. She's my hero," said Pete Balzano, Brooklyn's father.
By CAMERON TAYLOR
6 News Reporter


MORRISTOWN (WATE) - A family in Morristown is searching for answers about a rare condition that their daughter has developed. 8 year old Brooklyn Jade has been diagnosed with dystonia, which is a neurological movement disorder. 

8 year old Brooklyn seems like any other child her age. She loves to sing and play her guitar. Brooklyn also can't get enough of her favorite movie, Titanic. 


"In her own mind, she thinks she's as normal as any kid. She's a lot stronger than I am. She's my hero," said Pete Balzano, Brooklyn's father.

Brooklyn is battling a rare disorder called dystonia. It affects her legs, arms, speech, and brain.

Her parents say doctors misdiagnosed her twice before they could identify the condition in March of 2013. They say there isn't much research out there about the disorder. 


"I feel that there's not enough answers out there. You can run as many tests as you want to and everybody's got something different," said Sandra Eldridge, Brooklyn's mother.  

Dystonia is rarely found in children. Doctors have told Brooklyn's parents that her condition could eventually put her in a wheel chair.

For now, she is taking medication used for Parkinson's Disease patients to curb the symptoms.


"I'm not going to accept the fact that my daughter is going to lose her mobility to walk. I'm not going to do it. I have faith that there's going to be a cure," said Eldridge. 

That cure they believe could be found if more people learn about dystonia. 


"We think it's very important that the more people that know about this disorder, the more chance there be a cure found for it," said Balzano.

Brooklyn is also asking that you share, comment, or like her Facebook page. 


More online: Prayers for Brooklyn J'ade

She's set her goal high at 1 million shares. 

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