Knoxville neighborhoods begin setting up 'Little Free Libraries'

Knoxville neighborhoods begin setting up 'Little Free Libraries' to promote reading

Posted:
You may have noticed some new additions to a few Knoxville neighborhoods. They are called "Little Free Libraries" and they are used to help promote reading. You may have noticed some new additions to a few Knoxville neighborhoods. They are called "Little Free Libraries" and they are used to help promote reading.
The boxes are set up on personal properties and neighborhood parks, where anyone in the neighborhood can come take a book and leave a book. The boxes are set up on personal properties and neighborhood parks, where anyone in the neighborhood can come take a book and leave a book.
The movement started in Wisconsin in 2009 when one man built a model of a one room schoolhouse and filled it with free books as a tribute to his mother, a former school teacher who loved reading. The movement started in Wisconsin in 2009 when one man built a model of a one room schoolhouse and filled it with free books as a tribute to his mother, a former school teacher who loved reading.
By DREW GARDNER
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - You may have noticed some new additions to a few Knoxville neighborhoods. They are called "Little Free Libraries" and they are used to help promote reading.

The boxes are set up on personal properties and neighborhood parks, where anyone in the neighborhood can come take a book and leave a book.

"My older son is really excited about it," said Sarah Moss.

Moss has lived in the neighborhood for three years and often brings her kids to the Old North Knoxville Park where a little free library was installed this spring.

"It's handy because we have a bench over there we can just grab a book and sit and read for a bit," said Moss. "If we want to take it home we can take it home, or we can leave it and bring another one back."

A local contractor had the idea to build this one, and neighborhood kids got to help decorate it.

"It's just something fun and different," said Moss. "It's exciting because since it's volunteer program, and it's sort of a unique collective cooperative thing we all can do."

The movement started in Wisconsin in 2009 when one man built a model of a one room schoolhouse and filled it with free books as a tribute to his mother, a former school teacher who loved reading. Now it’s become a worldwide campaign to promote literacy that Moss hopes will continue in other neighborhoods around town.

If you would like to set up a "little Free Library" of your own you can purchase a kit online here.
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