Walters State leading Tennessee in 'flipping' classrooms

Walters State leading Tennessee in 'flipping' classrooms

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Educators from colleges and universities across the state gathered at Walters State Community College in Morristown Friday to discuss the mobilization of classrooms. Educators from colleges and universities across the state gathered at Walters State Community College in Morristown Friday to discuss the mobilization of classrooms.
In a flipped classroom, almost everything is removed, including paper, pencils and books. In a flipped classroom, almost everything is removed, including paper, pencils and books.
To do so, they use iPads and tablets to perform group projects with real-world challenges. Students say that had been lacking in the past. To do so, they use iPads and tablets to perform group projects with real-world challenges. Students say that had been lacking in the past.
"It pushes you to collaborate," said junior Sarah Caylor. "You don't have a choice. You have to." "It pushes you to collaborate," said junior Sarah Caylor. "You don't have a choice. You have to."
By DREW GARDNER
6 News Reporter

MORRISTOWN (WATE) - You may be familiar with the term "flipping" when it comes to homes, but now it's being applied to the classroom.

Teachers are getting rid of pretty much everything other than iPads and tablets.

Educators from colleges and universities across the state gathered at Walters State Community College in Morristown Friday to discuss the mobilization of classrooms.

Assistant Professor of Education Darlene Smith has been instrumental in the process of flipping classrooms.

"You are taking something that needs updating, because the classroom does not look the same anymore," said Smith. "The world is not the same anymore. The workforce is not the same anymore."

In a flipped classroom, almost everything is removed, including paper, pencils and books.

"The lectures aren't inside anymore," said Smith. "They are listening to all of that before they come, then when they walk in the door, they are ready to use that information to build something."

To do so, they use iPads and tablets to perform group projects with real-world challenges. Students say that had been lacking in the past.

"It pushes you to collaborate," said junior Sarah Caylor. "You don't have a choice. You have to."

Smith often has her students develop lesson plans using new apps that they will eventually use as teachers.

"I can pop up a Common Core standard," said Caylor. "I can pop up an app, a grade, a subject and have you an assignment in 10 minutes. And I think that's pretty cool because before, I probably couldn't have been able to do that, and now I can."

Vice President for Academic Affairs Lori Campbell says the main cost for a flip is the student's smart device.

"In most students cases that will have paid for itself before the end of that first semester," said Campbell.

"I've gotten more out of it, I think, than just buying a textbook and I have to take the textbook back," added Caylor.

Smith's first group to complete two semesters of flipped classes graduated this year.

"I am confident that I have sent them out better prepared than I ever have before," said Smith.

She hopes now to help bring that to other campuses.

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