KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WATE) — The Tennessee Department of Health, along with the Knox County Health Department, announced that they will offer the COVID-19 vaccine to those eligible in the Phase 1c population beginning March 8.

How to know if you’re eligible in Phase 1c population for COVID-19 vaccination:

Tennesseans 16 years or older with high-risk health conditions fall within the state’s Phase 1c.

According to the Tennessee Department of Health, the following is considered a high-risk health condition:

  • Chronic renal disease 
  • COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis, moderate-severe asthma
  • Obesity (body mass index greater than 30)
  • Heart failure, CAD, cardiomyopathies, hypertension
  • Sickle cell (not including sickle cell trait) or thalassemia
  • Cerebrovascular disease or stroke
  • Dementia
  • Liver disease
  • Technologically-dependent individuals ages >16 years and the household residents and caregivers of children <16 years old who are technologically-dependent (such as individuals who are ventilator-dependent, oxygen-dependent, with tracheostomy, wheelchair-bound due to high-risk medical condition, or require tube feedings, parenteral nutrition, or dialysis)
  • Individuals ages >16 years with immunocompromising conditions and the household residents and caregivers of children <16 years old who have immunocompromising conditions (such as individuals receiving chemotherapy, requiring daily oral steroids or other immunosuppressants, requiring medication to control diabetes, those with HIV/AIDS or other diagnosed high-risk immunodeficiency)
  • Household residents and caregivers of children <16 years old who have complex congenital heart disease requiring ongoing medical management, such as Tetralogy of Fallot, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and double outlet right ventricle, qualify for the Katie Beckett waiver
  • Pregnancy (NOTE: The CDC and World Health Organization have advised that pregnancy puts women at higher risk of severe illness due to COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines have not been studied in pregnant women, and women who are pregnant are encouraged to discuss this decision with their medical provider.)

How to calculate BMI:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has an adult BMI calculator one can use to figure out their body mass index.

The CDC says:

Body mass index (BMI) is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. BMI is an inexpensive and easy screening method for weight category — underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obesity.

BMI does not measure body fat directly, but BMI is moderately correlated with more direct measures of body fat. Furthermore, BMI appears to be as strongly correlated with various metabolic and disease outcome as are these more direct measures of body fatness.