LOS ANGELES (NewsNation Now) — The script supervisor on the film “Rust” filed a lawsuit against Alec Baldwin after he fatally shot cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on the movie set.

According to her attorney, Mamie Mitchell is haunted and too traumatized to return to work after 40 years in show business. Her lawsuit claims that Baldwin went off-script when he accidentally shot and killed Hutchins.

As the script supervisor, Mitchell was standing near Hutchins when the shooting happened. She spoke out publicly for the first time Wednesday.

“I will never forget what happened on the set of ‘Rust’ that day,” Mitchell said. “I relive the shooting and sound of the explosion from the gun over and over again. I am depressed. I don’t feel safe. I feel that at any moment anything can happen to me.”

Mitchell called 911 after the Oct. 21 shooting.

“Bonanza Creek Ranch … we’ve had two people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun,” Mitchell told the dispatcher. “We need help immediately.”

Attorney Gloria Allred filed suit on her behalf to seek compensatory and punitive damages. According to the suit, Baldwin was supposed to be armed, but he wasn’t supposed to open fire.

“In that scene, there was no script that called for him to discharge a gun,” Allred said. “That is very important. So why the gun was discharged, the facts will have to fully come out.”

According to discussions before the scene was filmed, it called for three tight shots of Baldwin: One on his eyes, one on a bloodstain on his shoulder, and one on his torso as he pulled the gun from a holster, the suit says.

And it alleges Baldwin violated protocol by not checking the gun more carefully.

“Mr. Baldwin chose to play Russian roulette when he fired a gun without checking it, and without having the armorer do so in his presence,” Allred said.

The lawsuit is the second to stem from the shooting, with many more expected.

A lawsuit was filed exactly a week ago by the lighting director on “Rust.” It also names Baldwin and more than a dozen others.

Baldwin has not publicly responded to either suit. He said on video Oct. 30 that the shooting was a “one-in-a-trillion event” saying, “We were a very, very well-oiled crew shooting a film together and then this horrible event happened.”

Mitchell’s suit alleges that the armorer on the production, Hannah Gutierrez Reed, had minimal experience, and she was hired as one of several cost-cutting measures that proved dangerous.

It says she violated protocol by allowing guns and ammunition to be unattended during a lunch break.

Gutierrez Reed told authorities she does not know how a live round ended up in the gun. Her lawyer, Jason Bowles, said in a statement last week that “we are convinced this was sabotage and Hannah is being framed. We believe that the scene was tampered with as well before the police arrived.”

Santa Fe-area District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies said last week that investigators have encountered no proof of sabotage.