Rise in violent crimes highlights need for self-defense classes

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — If you ask a woman if she feels safe walking alone at night, chances are she says no. Nowadays, more women carry pepper-spray, a whistle, or other tools to defend themselves, should they become a target of an attack.

Now, some women are taking matters into their own hands, literally. Chris White and Glenn Alred say they are seeing an increase in women signing up for self-defense classes.

“More people are wanting these classes because they see what’s going on in the world, and it’s just getting worse. So people are scared. They want to be able to protect themselves and their loved ones,” explains Alred.

Alred owns and operates Alpha & Omega Tactical Training, specializing in crisis readiness training. Partnering with Chris White’s Extreme Martial Arts class, the two are teaching women how to protect themselves.

“Just fight back. Make as much noise as you can. Kick. Scream,” says White, “we’re hoping to change the community to help out these ladies to defend themselves against the bad guys.”

With violent crimes on the rise in the Metro area, more women are signing up to learn how to face life or death scenarios.

The two say oftentimes, women make the easiest targets, especially on trails, secluded bike paths, and public parks.

According to the World Health Organization, globally, one in three women have either been physically or sexually assaulted, and the first step to bring that number down is knowing how to defend yourself.

“Knowledge is the main thing they need to know. The wisdom what to do when something happens. A lot of times when something happens, they freak out and freeze up, and if they freeze up, then they can get attacked,” White says.

The class teaches woman to keep their hands up, use strategic moves to hurt an attacker, give potential victims time to run away, and get out of a situation alive.

“If they have the knowledge and have the confidence, and they know what to do, then that can save their life,” says White.

One of the biggest problems they see are women who become distracted during what are considered more vulnerable times.

“On their phones, not paying attention to their surroundings, walking to the car at night, walking by themselves, walking too close to cars that are not theirs, not looking under or inside their vehicles before they get in it, all of those can create a victim really fast,” Alred explains.

The next class is scheduled to take place on July 10. Registration is set to be posted, on their Facebook page sometime this month.

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