TENNESSEE (WATE) — Four proposed constitutional amendments will appear on the Nov. 8, 2022 ballot after the candidates for governor and will be presented as yes or no questions.

The amendments are meant to determine if the Constitutions should be amended or changed.

According to the Secretary of State, a “yes” vote is a vote to amend the Constitution and adopt the proposed language in the amendment and a “no” vote is a vote not to amend the Constitution and keep the current language in the Consitution.

In order for an amendment to pass and become part of the Constitution, the amendment must get more “yes” votes than “no” votes. The “yes” votes must also be the majority of the total votes in the gubernatorial election.

The Secretary of State has provided the information about this year’s amendments.

Constitutional Amendment #1

The first amendment would make it illegal for any person, corporation, association or the State of Tennessee or its political subdivisions to deny or attempt to deny employment to any person because of the person’s membership in, affiliation with, resignation from, or refusal to join or affiliate with any labor union or employee organization.

The question on the ballot will say, “Shall Article XI of the Constitution of Tennessee be amended by adding the following language as a new section?”

Constitutional Amendment #2

This amendment would add a process for the temporary exercise of the powers and duties of the governor by the Speaker of the Senate—or the Speaker of the House if there is no Speaker of the Senate in office—when the governor is unable to discharge the powers and duties of the office of governor.

The question on the ballot will say, “Shall Article III, Section 12 of the Constitution of Tennessee be amended by adding the following language immediately following the current language in the Section?” 

Constitutional Amendment #3

This amendment would change the current language which says slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a person who has been duly convicted of crime, are forever prohibited in this State. The amendment would replace it with the following language: “Slavery and involuntary servitude are forever prohibited. Nothing in this section shall prohibit an inmate from working when the inmate has been duly convicted of a crime.”

The question on the ballot will say, “Shall Article I, Section 33 of the Constitution of Tennessee be amended by deleting the section and substituting instead the following?”

Constitutional Amendment #4

This amendment would delete article IX, section 1 of the Tennessee Constitution, which prohibits ministers of the gospel and priests of any denomination from holding a seat in either House of the legislature.

The question on the ballot will say, “Shall Article IX, Section 1 of the Constitution of Tennessee be amended by deleting the section?”

For more information about the 2022 Proposed Constitutional Amendments, visit sos.tn.gov/amendments.